Sydney,
22
April
2015
|
00:00
Australia/Sydney

Home offices cost Aussies $240 per month

Employers are passing costs onto the seven out of ten Australians who maintain a home office, according to research from global workplace provider, Regus. The survey, which polled over 1,194 business decision makers and professionals in Australia, found that 83% of respondents say that employers are not covering all their employees’ costs.

The research found that the cost burden on workers could be prohibitive; 48% of respondents say that setting up a fully functioning home office costs more than 20% of their annual salary. In fact, the average Australian home office is estimated to cost $240 per month, and 10% of respondents estimate they spend over $500 per month. This takes into account all the elements required to run a professional home office suite, including the cost of equipment, forgoing the use of a room, energy bills, cleaning and maintenance.

Other findings include:

  • Over half (55%) of respondents have set-up a fully equipped professional workspace in their home
  • Two-fifths (41%) think that most companies that encourage their employees to work from home are simply trying to transfer the cost of having workspace onto the employee.
  • 77% of Australian respondents believe that companies that encourage their employees to work from home are not aware that they must ensure health and safety standards are implemented.
  • 80% per cent said that employers do not take out the appropriate insurance cover on this home workspace.

Paul Migliorini, CEO of Regus Australia and New Zealand, commented: “Flexible working is already changing the shape of the Australian workplace, but it is important that people do not feel short changed by this evolution. Employers are finding efficiency and cost savings from following an agile approach to where their employees work. It is both smart business and fair practice to invest in home workers. This means both providing workers with the tools and financials they need, and taking health and safety concerns seriously.”

“Another important point is that, for many workers, a home workspace can be isolating. Empowering workers to use third places like public libraries, co-working communities or professional business centres can provide the right mix for people. At the end of the day, it’s all about being able to take control of your schedule and decide when and where you will be most productive.”

The cost of home working for small and large businesses

Do you have a fully-equipped professional workspace at home?

Australia

Small Businesses (0-49 Employees)

Large Businesses (250+ Employees)

Yes

55%

60%

40%

No

45%

40%

60%

If you have a home office, did your firm/employer pay for the equipment in your home office?

Australia

0-49 Employees

250+ Employees

Yes

37%

45%

11%

No

63%

55%

89%

How much do you think it would cost you to set up a fully functioning home office as a proportion of your annual take-home salary?

Australia

0-49 Employees

250+ Employees

Less than a fifth

52%

54%

47%

Around a third

11%

12%

8%

Around half

3%

2%

3%

Over half

1%

1%

1%

A monthly salary

26%

23%

35%

Over a monthly salary

8%

8%

7%

Source: Regus

Interestingly, large businesses were less likely to back home office working, with their employees less likely to have a home office and a overwhelming 90% of workers at large companies say their employer does not pay for equipment in their home office. In fact 45% of small business employees with a home office said their employer contributed to equipment costs.

Mr Migliorini commented: “I’m not surprised to see smaller and more agile businesses leading the way when it comes to home work, as they often have less red tape when it comes to making workplace changes. At the same time, small businesses need to ensure they have the right systems and processes in place to support their teams and protect their company.”

Boilerplate

Regus is the global workplace provider.

 

Its network of more than 2,300 business centres in 850 cities and 104 countries provides convenient, high-quality, fully serviced spaces for people to work, whether for a few minutes or a few years. Companies like Google, Toshiba and GlaxoSmithKline choose Regus so that they can work flexibly and make their businesses more successful.

 

The key to flexible working is convenience and so Regus is opening wherever its 2.1 million members want support - city centres, suburban districts, shopping centres and retail outlets, railway stations, motorway service stations and even community centres.

 

Founded in Brussels, Belgium, in 1989, Regus is based in Luxembourg and listed on the London Stock Exchange. For more information, please visit: www.regus.com.au