Brisbane,
22
April
2015
|
00:00
Australia/Sydney

Home offices cost Brisbane workers an average of $243 per month

Brisbane companies are passing costs onto the eight out of ten employees who maintain a home office, according to research from global workplace provider, Regus. The survey, which polled over 1,194 business decision makers and professionals in Australia, found that 84 per cent of Brisbane respondents say that employers are not covering all their employees’ costs.

The latest Regus study reported that only 43 per cent of Brisbane firms contributed to kitting out their employees’ home offices. It also found that the cost burden for employees working from home was high - 51 per cent of respondents say that setting up a fully functioning home office costs more than 20 per cent of their annual salary.

In fact, the average Brisbane home office is estimated to cost $243 per month. This takes into account all the essentials required to run a professional home office suite, including the cost of equipment, forgoing the use of a room, energy bills, cleaning and maintenance.

Brisbane findings include:

  • A total of 76 per cent of Brisbane respondents have a home office
  • Well over half (57 per cent) have set-up a fully equipped professional workspace in their home
  • 44 per cent of Brisbane respondents think most companies that encourage their employees to work from home are simply trying to transfer the cost of having a workspace onto the employee
  • 80 per cent of Brisbane respondents believe that companies that encourage their employees to work from home are not aware that they must ensure health and safety standards are implemented
  • 86 per cent said that employers do not take out the appropriate insurance cover on this home workspace
  • Most companies that encourage their employees to work from home do not cover all the costs of creating and maintaining that workspace (84 per cent)

Yusuf Oner, Area Director for Regus Queensland, said: “Flexible working has increased significantly over the past five years and it’s changing the nature of the Australian workforce. Brisbane employees and employers are finding many benefits such as increased productivity and a better work:life balance but it’s important to note that there are many considerations to make especially when individuals are working from home.

“Many companies could be incurring all sorts of expenses if they are not regulating the environment from which their staff members work. As seen in the research, a staggering 80 per cent of companies that encourage their employees to work from home are not aware that they must ensure health and safety standards are implemented. Furthermore, 86 per cent reported that they do not take out the appropriate insurance cover on the home workspace. These are the negative aspects of flexible working that must be addressed,” he said.

The cost of home-working for Australian cities

Do you have a home office?

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

Perth

Yes

76.2%

69.8%

67.6%

65.0%

No

23.8%

30.2%

32.4%

35.0%

Do you have a fully-equipped professional workspace at home?

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

Perth

Yes

56.8%

55.2%

56.1%

46.6%

No

43.2%

44.8%

43.9%

53.4%

If you have a home office, did your firm/employer pay for the equipment in your home office?

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

Perth

Yes

42.5%

39.9%

31.6%

28.1%

No

57.5%

60.1%

68.4%

71.9%

How much do you think it would cost you to set up a fully functioning home office as a proportion of your annual take-home salary?

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

Perth

Less than a fifth

48.6%

51.0%

54.0%

49.5%

Around a third

12.4%

10.0%

8.4%

14.6%

Around half

1.1%

3.5%

1.7%

1.0%

Over half

1.6%

1.4%

1.0%

1.0%

A monthly salary

28.1%

26.2%

27.2%

30.1%

Over a monthly salary

8.1%

7.9%

7.7%

3.9%

Source: Regus

Mr. Oner continued: “While Brisbane does have a long way to go to improve the conditions for home working, we were the highest city where firms were in fact contributing to the cost of the home office.

“Another important point is that, for many workers, a home workspace can be isolating. Empowering workers to use third places like public libraries, co-working communities or professional business centres can provide the right mix for people. At the end of the day, it’s all about being able to take control of your schedule and decide when and where you will be most productive,” Mr. Oner added.

Boilerplate

Regus is the global workplace provider.

Its network of more than 2,300 business centres in 850 cities and 104 countries provides convenient, high-quality, fully serviced spaces for people to work, whether for a few minutes or a few years. Companies like Google, Toshiba and GlaxoSmithKline choose Regus so that they can work flexibly and make their businesses more successful.

The key to flexible working is convenience and so Regus is opening wherever its 2.1 million members want support - city centres, suburban districts, shopping centres and retail outlets, railway stations, motorway service stations and even community centres.

Founded in Brussels, Belgium, in 1989, Regus is based in Luxembourg and listed on the London Stock Exchange. For more information, please visit: www.regus.com.au